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FURNISHING THE HOME

This is the art of choosing, arranging and maintaining furnishings in the home. Colour is an important aspect in furnishing.

Colour

Colour is an element of design which can only be seen in the presence of light

 

Characteristics of colour

There are three main characteristics of colour.

These are:

Hue

Value

Intensity

Hue

Hue is the name of a colour.

 

Value

Value is the degree of lightness or darkness of a colour.

The lighter values are known as tints while the darker values are known as shades.

To get tints white is added to the hue while black is added to get shades.

Intensity is the brightness or dullness of a colour.

 

Colour Wheel

A colour wheel is the arrangement of colour in a circle showing their relationship.

Colours are classified into three groups namely:

Primary Colours

Secondary Colours

Tertiary Colours

 

Primary colours

Primary colours are basic colours and cannot be produced by mixing other colours.

These are:

Red

Blue

Yellow

 

Secondary Colours

Secondary colours are obtained by mixing two primary colours.

They are:

Orange

Green

Violet

Orange

Orange is obtained by mixing red and yellow.

Green

Green is obtained by mixing yellow and blue.

Violet/ purple

Violet/purple is obtained by mixing red and blue.

Tertiary Colours

Tertiary Colours are obtained by mixing a primary and a secondary colour.

These include:

Creating a Colour Wheel

Colour scheme

Colour scheme is the overall effect of the colour used on all the surfaces in a room or space.

 

There are many types of colour schemes however in this topic we shall discuss the following:

Monochromatic

Analogous

Complementary

Triad

 

Monochromatic colour scheme

This is whereby one colour is used together with its tints and shades.

Analogous colour scheme

This is the use of two or three colours that lie next to each other on the colour wheel.

Complementary colour scheme

This is combining of colours that are opposite each other on the colour wheel which creates a contrasting harmony.

Complementary colour schemes include:

Single complementary

Split complementary

Double complementary

 

Single complementary

This is the use of one colour and the directly opposite it on the colour wheel.

Split complementary

This is the use of a colour and two other colours on either side of its complement on the colour wheel.

For example, green, red-violet and red-orange.

Double complementary

This is a colour scheme that uses four colours.

Two colours and their complements.

Triad colour scheme

This is the use of three colours which are at equal distance from each other on the colour wheel.

 

See also:

LIGHTING IN THE HOME

FUELS IN THE HOME

VENTILATION

SICK AT HOME

CONSUMER PROTECTION

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